Want to stay where the humpbacks play? Why the whales Fraser Island

 The Southern Humpback whales have returned to the waters of the Fraser Coast and this year, they are ready to party! After greeting visitors with plenty of breaches and tail slaps, these curious and intelligent creatures were keen to do some “people watching” getting right up close with the Quick Cat Cruise boats.

Baby whale calf playing the protected walkers of the Fraser Coast
So why are some pods of whales more “active” than others? Just like us humans, it often comes down to what stage the whales are at in life. Whales generally mate every second year- and carry a calf for 11 months. Mother whales will mate in the warm waters of Queensland towards the end of whale season, and return the next year a give birth to their calf.

A whale calf typically weighs 1.5 tonnes and are just over 4 metres in length when they are born. Newborn calves will stay with their mother to feed and learn the ropes for roughly one year before venturing off to join a juvenile pod for a migration at around two to three years old. Traditionally a full adult whale will escort a mother whale and her calf back down along the Australian cost to Antarctica.

By the time whales join a pod of juveniles they are roughly six to seven metres in length and full of energy and curiosity (imagine whales on schoolies).  They are usually some of the first pods in the migration and, at times, can get lost along the way.

Juvenile whales play in the waters off Fraser Island 
A pod of whales is usually two or three, and they can often meet up in the waters off Fraser Island where five or six whales may be in close proximity to each other. In some cases, such as Migaloo the white whale, a pod can actually just be one whale. But generally they travel in pods of two or three.

Last, but definitely not least, are the big bulls – the full grown adult male whales which can grow up to 14.5 metres in length and weigh up to 36,000 kilograms. These whales generally follow along the tail of the migration.

Whales love to frolic and play in the calm waters of Hervey Bay, protected from the strong winds and ocean currents by Fraser Island with approximately 20,000 humpback whales migrating along the Australian coast each year. 

Humans aren’t the only friends whales make along the way with dolphins and dugong often spotted amongst whale pods in and around Hervey Bay.


If you haven’t seen these incredible creatures close up, check-out these fantastic packages that include whale watch cruises and accommodation on World Heritage-listed Fraser Island.



Want to see the whales up-close? Here's why the whales love to play off Fraser Island

 The Southern Humpback whales have returned to the waters of the Fraser Coast and this year, they are ready to party! After greeting visitors with plenty of breaches and tail slaps, these curious and intelligent creatures were keen to do some “people watching” getting right up close with the Quick Cat Cruise boats.

Baby whale calf playing the protected walkers of the Fraser Coast
So why are some pods of whales more “active” than others? Just like us humans, it often comes down to what stage the whales are at in life. Whales generally mate every second year- and carry a calf for 11 months. Mother whales will mate in the warm waters of Queensland towards the end of whale season, and return the next year a give birth to their calf.

A whale calf typically weighs 1.5 tonnes and are just over 4 metres in length when they are born. Newborn calves will stay with their mother to feed and learn the ropes for roughly one year before venturing off to join a juvenile pod for a migration at around two to three years old. Traditionally a full adult whale will escort a mother whale and her calf back down along the Australian cost to Antarctica.

By the time whales join a pod of juveniles they are roughly six to seven metres in length and full of energy and curiosity (imagine whales on schoolies).  They are usually some of the first pods in the migration and, at times, can get lost along the way.

Juvenile whales play in the waters off Fraser Island 
A pod of whales is usually two or three, and they can often meet up in the waters off Fraser Island where five or six whales may be in close proximity to each other. In some cases, such as Migaloo the white whale, a pod can actually just be one whale. But generally they travel in pods of two or three.

Last, but definitely not least, are the big bulls – the full grown adult male whales which can grow up to 14.5 metres in length and weigh up to 36,000 kilograms. These whales generally follow along the tail of the migration.

Whales love to frolic and play in the calm waters of Hervey Bay, protected from the strong winds and ocean currents by Fraser Island with approximately 20,000 humpback whales migrating along the Australian coast each year. 

Humans aren’t the only friends whales make along the way with dolphins and dugong often spotted amongst whale pods in and around Hervey Bay.


If you haven’t seen these incredible creatures close up, check-out these fantastic packages that include whale watch cruises and accommodation on World Heritage-listed Fraser Island.



Choose Your Next Adventure on Fraser

Our sandy home of Fraser Island lies just off the east coast of paradisiacal Queensland. Kingfisher Bay Resort was recently thrilled to be featured in an article by Expedia all about the best ways to experience the island entitled, 'Experience the best of Fraser Island'.

‘This award-winning resort is the luxury option on the island, with villas sporting modern beach d├ęcor. Couples looking for a romantic getaway should opt for a spa villa and soak their cares away in the open air of a private deck.’

A world-heritage listed island, Fraser Island is an ideal destination for bird watchers and lovers of nature, wildlife and wildflowers. 

The Island is home to an incredible number of bird species, more than 230 to be exact. Rare and endangered animal species of all sorts can be found on The Great Sandy Strait, the stretch of water which separates Fraser Island from the mainland.

But for the most part it’s the spectacular lakes that draw all types of travellers from around the world to the largest sand island in the world. Fraser Island provides a fantastic opportunity to explore magnificent white sand dunes, rainforests and sand cliffs of striking colours. 

Visit some of the island’s perched lakes, such as the deepest lake on the island, Lake Wabby, the beautifully clear Lake McKenzie, Basin Lake, which is a black-water perched lake. Eli Creek is fun for the whole family as natural currents guide your under aromatic gum trees.

You can partake in an educational tour offered by us at the Kingfisher Bay Resort. Or simply stay in a Wilderness Lodge at the resort and you will be surrounded by gum trees, bush plants and native birds, letting you begin your bird watching adventure at the break of dawn! 

The resort hotel also offers luxurious spa rooms, one, two, and three bedroom villas, and holiday houses, and is the perfect venue for conferences, meetings, and romantic weddings.

Swim in the clear waters of Lake McKenzie, fish on Seventy-Five Mile Beach, visit the SS Maheno shipwreck on the eastern beach, or climb Indian Head and take in the spectacular views of the Island’s coast. Look out for turtles, dolphins, sharks, and rays from this rocky headland, which is on the eastern side of the Island.

Whatever adventure you choose be sure to return to a luxurious stay in our premier resort. We look forward to welcoming you to the island!